For Black History Month, students in the Archdiocese of Washington were inspired to draw pictures of a young student named Ruby Bridges, who was the first black student to desegregate an all-white elementary school in New Orleans in 1960. In their writings for the February Junior Saints, the students admired her bravery.

"I chose Ruby Bridges because I want to be as brave and courageous as her. She was able to go into a school where no one else is like her." -Veronica Carter, seventh grade, St. Bartholomew School, Bethesda, Maryland
"The person that I drew was Ruby Bridges. Ruby really inspires me because she was courageous and continued to go to school even though it was dangerous. And this is so important to me because she cleared the way for little brown kids like me." -Leilah Shell, seventh grade, St. Pius X Regional School, Bowie, Maryland
"I admire Ruby Bridges because she was the first African American to attend an all white school. If she didn't do that, I wouldn't have met one of my best friends, Rawlins." -Alexa Yingling, sixth grade, St. John's School, Hollywood, Maryland
"I admire Ruby Bridges because she was brave enough to stand up for black education in a time when segregation was normal. As a young girl she did not give up on her education and continued her studies despite controversy." -Julia Palor, sixth grade, St. Columba School, Oxon Hill, Maryland
"I admire Ruby Bridges because she only wanted to learn to read and write. She also wanted to be smart and go to school." -Molly McCarthy, sixth grade, St. John's School, Hollywood, Maryland